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chunky cove mitts

When I published my Ripple Wave Fingerless Mitt pattern a few years ago, a friend of mine asked if I could adapt it to a heavier yarn. Sure, I said. No problem. And then I kind of forgot about it until a few months ago when I was wanting to knit up some finished mitts for Room6 before Christmas. With no time to do fingering weight mitts, but what about bulky yarn and hey, I have practically a yarn shop of bulky yarn right now in my craft studio.

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I quickly dyed up some tonal yarn in my trusty crock pot, got my Ripple Wave pattern out and played around with it and came up with these Chunky Cove Mitts.

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It has a similar design: wide cuff, a pattern of increases and decreases, and a wide cuff at the top to be worn up or folded down. It has half the number of stitches as the Ripple Waves and once I got the pattern figured out, it was knit in about 2 hours’ time. That is very, very satisfying!

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So here is the pattern for sale on Ravelry.

Chunky Cove Mitts.

It is knit with approximately 110-130 yards of bulky-weight yarn on size 10US (6mm) needles.

As always, I have proofed, had it test knit, proofed again and again, but if there is an error or something that isn’t clear, please let me know!

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Cheers!

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a knitting book review

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Well, here is something new for me. I was contacted by Artisan Books not long ago to see if I’d be interested in reviewing* a book that was recently published: Susan B. Anderson’s Kids’ Knitting Workshop.

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Book Description:   Beloved knitting instructor Susan B. Anderson presents her first book targeted at a young audience. This accessible introduction to knitting in the round includes easy-to-follow illustrated tutorials on techniques from casting on and binding off to joining colors to make stripes, and 17 progressively challenging knitting projects—beginning with simple infinity scarves and hats and building to supersweet toys and decor. Step-by-step text and photographs that kids can read and follow on their own mean they will be knitting independently in no time! Also included is a chapter on stocking your toolbox and sourcing yarn; plus advice on starting a knitting group, connecting with local knitting communities, charity knitting, and more.

I’m all for teaching anybody to knit, young and old. I’ve taught one of my three children (the other two haven’t been interested, but when they are…!) and it’s something that she still does when she has the time to devote to it. Once you’ve learned, I think it’s something that will always stick with you even if you don’t knit for a while. I’ve taught friends to knit and really honed my knitting skills when I worked in a yarn shop many many years ago when we lived in Ohio. I sure could have used a book like this!

This is a beautiful hard-bound book with a spiral binding. I love a spiral-bound book, especially when you want it to stay open on a page, like you would do with a knitting tutorial and pattern.

With beautiful photographs, diagrams, and clear and careful explanations, she guides the reader through the basics of knitting: the tools and yarn, how to read a yarn label, how to wind a skein (all things that by now we experienced knitters take for granted), how to fix mistakes, and something that I think is most valuable… how to unknit. And yes, I learned a thing or two here!

She starts out with simple projects: a Little Hat, Wrap Bracelet, Cowl, Stripy Tube Scarf and Stripy Hat, which is the first pattern I decided to knit.

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It’s adorable and I had lots of little bits of bulky yarn to use up… perfect!

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I do cast on differently than what she describes in the book, so I did it her way. The description and diagram makes it very easy to do. I also do a different method for attaching the next colour of yarn, so again I followed Susan’s instructions and I think I’ll stick with her method, which is to hook the new yarn around the previous stitches instead of attaching the new yarn with a knot. That knot has always bugged me.

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I’ve never made a pom pom before. Hard to believe in my long years (long!!) I’ve never done one, so this one is my first. It’s a little ragged looking, but it’s a pom pom! More pom poms are definitely in my future.

There are a couple of patterns that I’m going to give a try next. In the Intermediate Skills and Projects chapter, I think the Toasty Headband is pretty cute. Also included is Hat with a Rib, Cuffed Basket, Stripy Leg Warmers and Tablet/Journal Pocket.

I decided to knit the Cuffed Basket out of some handspun I have had for a few months. It’s a lovely wool and silk noil blend, spun as thick and thin singles. I love the simplicity of it.

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And is a nice addition on my table.

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For the Advanced Skills and Projects chapter, the patterns are really cute: a Snowman, Mason Jar Cozies, Fox Pillow, Puppy & Bunny Hand Puppets and Owl & Kitten Toys.

If I have one little criticism, it is that it would have been nice to have a listing of all the patterns in the table of contents for quick and easy reference. But really that is very minor.

I think this is a wonderful little book to get young people knitting. Let’s keep the tradition alive!

About the author:

AUTHOR PHOTO. Susan B. Anderson. Credit Evan AndersonSusan B. Anderson is the author of Itty-Bitty Hats, Itty-Bitty Nursery, Itty-Bitty Toys, Spud & Chloe at the Farm, and Topsy-Turvy Inside-Out Knit Toys. Her popular knitting blog, susanbanderson.blogspot.com, won the Reader’s Choice Award on About.com for the top-knitting blog/website in 2012. Susan also has a YouTube channel with dozens of instructional knitting videos that can be found under SusanBAnderson. She lives in Madison, Wisconsin, with her husband and four children.

*This book was provided to me by Artisan Books. All opinions are entirely my own.

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lions gate bridge west van

me projects

It was such a gorgeous day to get out and go for a long walk yesterday along the seawall in West Vancouver. It’s the kind of day that makes me love walking, love this city and love the sunshine (with a little bit of fog mixed in).

I’m caught up on projects for Room6 right now, and the summer market season is a good 5-6 months away (tons of time!!!) so I’m making fun stuff… for me :)

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I finished a cowl made from Malabrigo Rasta, a super bulky merino wool yarn purchased from All Wound Up in Edmonds, WA. One skein to make the Rainbow Twist Cowl, a free pattern on Ravelry. It was so quick to make… almost too quick! I’ve always been a process knitter and this cowl is easily done in an evening. So yeah, I may have ripped it all out just to knit it again ;)

Very soft, very chunky and warm and very wonderful!

Ravelry Link.

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Cowl numero 2, using my Deep Cove Cowl recipe. I’m making it smaller, cast on 128 stitches instead of 144. The yarn is Punta Yarns Merisoft Handpaint in Cobalt from Urban Yarns in Edgemont Village. It’s lovely and soft. I don’t have anything like this in this colour, so it is essential… right?

Ravelry Link.

I love crocheting and I haven’t done much of it lately. With all the knitting I’ve been doing, my hands have been getting cramped and sore, so this is such a nice change of pace to crochet. My hands thank me. And everyone else will thank me when they get to snuggle under a new blanket.

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This is the Granny Stripe by Attic24. I made one of these in 2010 for my girls’ apartment when they were in university. It’s now living in Toronto with my oldest daughter, keeping her warm through the Ontario winter. I always meant to make one for me and it’s taken about 6 years to get to it. My time has come! The yarn is Stylecraft Special DK that I bought a few years ago, the Lucy Pack, from Deramores in the UK.

My modifications simple. I’m making this a 1-row stripe rather than 2-row stripes called for in the pattern. I love the colourful striping the 1-row pattern does. I’m going to have a heck of a lot of ends to weave in though. I’ll worry about that another day.

Ravelry Link.

So that’s what’s been going on around here. Lots of fun projects. Lots of walking outside when the rains let up.

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I hope your week includes some fun projects too!

:)

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fingerless mitts

It’s been a knitting frenzy of fingerless mitts around here. Both sets are based on my Ripple-Wave Fingerless Mitts.

First of all, I whipped off 6 pairs for Room6 in our hand-dyed bulky yarn. I’m working on the pattern, getting it test knit before I publish it.

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They are very soft and squishy made with the bulky wool. I had to keep trying them on as I went, but the pattern seemed to come together really easily.

 

 

 

 

 

I also had a lot of fun knitting up these fingering-weight mitts. It’s my pattern, but minus the ripple. The yarn’s pattern does all the work, all I needed to do was just knit! And now I want to make a pair out of each colourway. It’s the Arne & Carlos Regia sock wool. Amazing!

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I love this lull between Christmas and New Years… a quiet time to enjoy the family, food and stress-free knitting!

Wishing you a Happy New Year!

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Panorama Stole

Oh, two posts in less than a week… crazy!!

I finally got around to writing up and publishing this pattern for a simple, crescent-shaped stole that I knit a few years ago. I’ve knit 3 out of handspun and they are so soft to wear, easy to throw around the shoulders and quick to knit.

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It’s very simple construction. You start with three stitches and then increase at each end on each row. I love the texture of different stitches, and obviously from my other patterns I love garter ridges and eyelets, so I’ve incorporated those stitch patterns into the stole.

I recently dyed and spun some BFL handspun for a good friend and she wanted to make this stole after seeing me wear mine one day.

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photo by nancy

And she’s knitting another one out of some Madeline Tosh, and just ordered some more handspun to make a third one. Well that got me to thinking that I really need to do a better job at writing it out, so here it is!

Panorama Stole

I’m offering this as a free pattern on Ravelry as a thank you to everyone who has supported our little yarn adventure. I hope you enjoy it!

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Happy knitting!

:)